IELTS
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IELTS
2019-05-09 

Are you looking for a way to show your language learners what they're getting from a lesson?

https://t.co/JoMQ4dPREx
IELTS
2019-05-09 

Are you looking for a way to show your language learners what they're getting from a lesson?

https://t.co/JoMQ4dPREx
IELTS
2019-04-28 

​​ ➖➖Double Negative➖➖. A double negative uses two negative words (in bold below) in the same clause to express a single negative idea:

• We didn't see nothing. = We saw nothing.
• She never danced with nobody. = She didn't dance with anybody.
The rules dictate that the two negative elements cancel each other out to give a positive statement instead, so that the sentence ‘I don’t know nothing’ could literally be interpreted as ‘I do know something’.
📌 Double negatives are standard in many other languages and they were also a normal part of English usage until some time after the 16th century. They’re still widely used in English dialects where they don’t seem to cause any confusion as to the intended meaning. Nevertheless, they aren’t considered acceptable in current standard English and you should avoid them in all but very informal situations. Just use a single negative instead:
• We didn’t see anything.
• She never danced with anyone.
📌 There is one type of double negative that is considered grammatically correct and which people use to make a statement more subtle. Take a look at the following sentence:
• I am not unconvinced by his argument.
📌 The use of not together with unconvinced suggests that the speaker has a few mental reservations about the argument. The double negative creates a nuance of meaning that would not be present had the speaker just said:
• I am convinced by his argument.
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IELTS
2019-04-14 

USING "HATE", "LIKE", & "LOVE"

The verbs hate, love, like, & prefer are usually followed by a gerund when the meaning is general, and by the infinitive when they refer to a particular time or situation. You must always use the infinitive with the expressions would love to, would hate to, etc. These verbs can also be followed by a that-clause or by a noun.
EXAMPLES
▫️I hate to tell you, but Uncle Jim is coming this weekend.
▫️I hate looking after elderly relatives!
▫️I hate mushrooms.
▫️I hate that he lied to you.
▫️I love dancing.
▫️I love to dance at the jazz club.
▫️I would love to dance with you.
▫️I love ballet.
▫️I love that you remembered my birthday!
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IELTS
2019-03-14 

IELTS Tips - Listening 👂. 🔸The accents of the speakers on the tape are primarily British.

This means you must become accustomed to understanding the nuances of such accents. If you have been watching a lot of American television, (shows such as Friends, for example) it will not really help you. British accents are quite different and it is better to spend time in the months before the test listening to British radio stations and podcasts or watching the BBC, British shows, and movies. This is one of the major difference between the IELTS exam and the TOEFL, which features more American accents.
🔸Get used to the way letters and numbers are pronounced in British (and American)English. Sometimes, in the listening section, you are asked to write down the spelling of a name, place, or address. If you make a mistake in the spelling while writing it down, you will get the answer wrong.
🔸The expressions used also tend to be taken from British rather than American English. This means you may hear unfamiliar idioms, which can confuse you. Speakers may also use British words for common items such as "flat" for "apartment", "lorry" for "truck", or "advert" for advertisement. Make sure you study the most common differences in British and American vocabulary and listen to as many IELTS exercises as possible before your exam to prepare you for the actual test experience.
🔸Learn to distinguish opinion from fact. In the third and fourth listening passages, you will probably be tested on what one of the speakers thinks or what his / her view is. This may or may not be stated outright, but as an underlying theme in the whole conversation or in the tone of the speakers voice, rather than the words themselves.
🔸Don't worry if your classmates or friends get higher listening scores than you. Each one has his or her strengths and weaknesses, just like you. Each one also has his or her own language goals. Just focus on your own needs and don't compare yourself to others.
🔸Follow instructions very carefully. If the instructions state, "Write no more than three words",then you must not write more or you will receive no marks for your answer, even if some of the words you wrote were part of the correct answer. Similarly, read each instruction carefully. Sometimes, you are asked to circle two answers, sometimes three, and so on. You must read the instruction each time as it may differ from the previous ones. Remember, the ability to follow instructions in English is a test in itself.
🔸The questions follow the oral text. Remember this - it will make it easier for you to focus on the current question, or to know when you've been left behind, in case the speakers have gone on to providing the answer to the following questions.
🔸Familiarize yourself with charts, graphs, flow-charts, bar charts and pie charts, etc. These often appear as part of the answer choices in the fourth section. The more comfortable you are with interpreting the data represented in them, the easier your exam will be.
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IELTS
2019-03-12 

IELTS Tips - Reading. ▪️To know whether you should read the IELTS Reading passage first or the questions first, experiment with both strategies and see what works best for you.

Many students have found it helps to skim through the questions first to get an idea of what to pay attention to in the reading passage. This method may work for you too, but in reality, it depends on a number of factors. These include how well or how quickly you read, the type of questions, how difficult they are, how much time you have, and so on. So, never mind what your teacher recommends, or what your best friend is going to do. Try both ways and see what helps you the most.
▪️Read the IELTS Reading instructions carefully. Don’t try to save time by skipping this part. The instructions give you critical information about how many words the answer should be, what exactly you need to do, and so on. Always read the instructions, even if you have done hundreds of practice tests already!
▪️In many cases, the questions follow the order of the information in the reading passages. This will help you find the required answers quickly.
▪️Spelling matters, so take care while writing in the short answers. You will lose points for incorrect spelling. Take special care when copying words from the text.
▪️Grammar counts too, so make sure you pay attention to this aspect as well.
▪️In sentence completion tasks, focus on the meaning to select the right answer.
▪️Do many practice tests to familiarize yourself with the test format, the types of questions, the level of difficulty and more.
▪️Read widely from a variety of sources to strengthen your general reading skills and enrich your vocabulary.
▪️Look out for key synonyms used in the text or question, to help you identify where to find the answer quickly.
▪️Use only the stated number of words in your answer or you will lose the mark. Hyphenated words count as one word.
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IELTS
2019-03-03 

Do you want more country/folk music in the channel?

Anonymous Poll 41% Yes 15% No 16% I like pop-music 16% I prefer different genre 12% I do not want to see musical posts in this channel
IELTS
2019-03-03 

1️⃣6️⃣ Sixteen Tons. By Tennessee Ernie Ford (1955)

Some people say a man is made out of mud
A poor man's made out of muscle and blood
Muscle and blood and skin and bones
A mind that's weak and a back that's strong
Chorus
You load sixteen tons, what do you get?
Another day older and deeper in debt
Saint Peter don't you call me, 'cause I can't go
I owe my soul to the company store
I was born one morning when the sun didn't shine
I picked up my shovel and I walked to the mine
I loaded sixteen tons of number-nine coal
And the straw boss said, "Well-a bless my soul!"
You load sixteen tons, what do you get?
Another day older and deeper in debt
Saint Peter don't you call me, 'cause I can't go
I owe my soul to the company store
I was born one morning, it was drizzlin' rain
Fightin' and trouble are my middle name
I was raised in the cane
Break by an old mama lion
Can't no high-toned woman make me walk the line
You load sixteen tons, what do you get?
Another day older and deeper in debt
Saint Peter don't you call me, 'cause I can't go
I owe my soul to the company store
If you see me comin' better step aside
A lot of men didn't, a lot of men died
One fist of iron, the other of steel
If the right one don't getcha then the left one will
You load sixteen tons, what do you get?
Another day older and deeper in debt
Saint Peter don't you call me, 'cause I can't go
I owe my soul to the company store
@ielts_bot
IELTS
2019-03-03 

🎵 Lyrics time. Tennessee Ernie Ford - Sixteen Tons. Album: Sixteen Tons. Release date:

April 10, 1955
Clear lyrics of Tennessee Ernie Ford can help you to improve your pronunciation and speech in general
@ielts_bot
IELTS
2019-03-01 

Learn English Vocabulary Tips. 📌 Tip #1 Being Understood

If you're struggling to get someone to understand you, try the tips below:-
Speak more slowly (not louder!)
Keep it simple. Use words that are most common. For example, if you want to say cat, don't use the word feline.
Keep it simple. Use basic sentence structures (subject/verb/object).
Don't worry about pronouns, instead use the names of people you are talking about.
Use a lot of hand gestures. "Do you mean up?" Raise up your hands to help the person understand the word.
Use sound effects. You may feel silly, but if you are trying to tell someone that something exploded, using the sound "Ka Boom!" will get your point across!
📌 Tip #2 Repetition Repetition Repetition
Learning a word won't help very much if you promptly forget it. Research shows that it takes from 10 to 20 repetitions to really make a word part of your vocabulary.
It helps to write the word - both the definition and a sentence you make up using the word - perhaps on an index card that can later be reviewed.
As soon as you learn a new word, start using it. Review your index cards periodically to see if you have forgotten any of your new words.
📌 Tip #3 Learn Synonyms
Synonyms - are words that mean the same thing. When you have learnt a new word see if there are any synonyms for it. It expands your vocabulary and it will make your English more interesting and less repetitive.
There are several online dictionaries that can help: Thesaurus.com | Synonym.com | Rhymezone.com
Yet again using flash cards as a memory aid can help. Write the word you know on one side of the card and the most common synonyms for that word on the other side. See how many you can remember.
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